Review: The Rest of Us Just Live Here by Patrick Ness

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Not everyone has to be the Chosen One. Not everyone has to be the guy who saves the world. Most people just have to live their lives the best they can, doing the things that are great for them, having great friends, trying to make their lives better, loving people properly. All the while knowing that the world makes no sense but trying to find a way to be happy anyway.

I was hooked as soon as I read the title, The Rest of Us Just Live Here. Granted, I was already a fan of Patrick Ness after reading The Knife of Letting Go and A Monster Calls (I didn’t include my review of A Monster Calls on my blog, but you can find it on my Goodreads page). The premise of The Rest of Us Just Live Here feels like a homage to the Buffyverse, as it centres around a group of teenage friends who are just trying to survive high school, while supernatural forces battle with the Chosen Ones, aka the indie kids.

Each chapter opens with a brief summary of the goings on of the indie kids and the supernatural elements. The summaries are hilarious (so many hipsters named Finn!), and there are moments when the supernatural elements spill out into the main story, including this gem:

‘Which is when one of the indie kids comes running out of the treeline, his old-timey jacket flapping out behind him. He pushes his fashionably black-rimmed glasses back on his nose and runs past about twenty feet from where we’re all tumbled together. He doesn’t see us – the indie kids never really see us, not even when we’re sitting next to them in class – just crosses the Field and disappears into the opposite treeline, which we all know only leads to deeper forest.
There’s a silent few seconds where we all exchange wtf glances and then a young girl glowing with her own light comes running out of the woods from where the indie kids came. She doesn’t see us either, though she’s so bright we all have to shade our eyes, and then she disappears into the second treeline, too.’

While there are many comedic moments surrounding the battle between the indie kids and the supernatural forces, The Rest of Us Just Live Here also examines the division between teens and adults, which is attributed to the teens being the only ones caught up (whether directly or as witnesses to) the supernatural war. The possibility is raised that adults rationalise the supernatural occurrences away as natural disasters in order to downplay the severity of the situation. It is also suggested that perhaps the adults experienced or witnessed supernatural phenomena as teens, but they have forgotten what it was like to be teenagers. The (possibly willing) ignorance adults have to the teen experience has detrimental effects on the teen characters. What is most heartbreaking is that the damage caused to the 17-year-old narrator, Mikey, and his 18-year-old sister, Mel, is not as a direct result of the paranormal, but of the (direct or indirect) negligence shown by their parents. At no point does the presence of the mental illnesses depicted in the novel feel as a plot device, as each illness is explored and presented in a thoughtful and earnest manner.

The Rest of Us Just Live Here is a highly emotionally evocative read, due, in no small part, to the diverse range of characters and their multifaceted relationship. Arguably, the most poignant relationship is Mikey and his sister, Mel. Their relationship is beautifully understated despite the high stakes they face, through the way in which they observe and react to one another. And while they both have their own romantic interests and personal battles, their relationship is never at risk of fading away to a minor footnote in the novel.

The Rest of Us Just Live Here is a thrilling, hilarious, poignant and heartbreaking read. Patrick Ness is a masterful storyteller.

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Patrick Ness and Jesse Andrews will be appearing in conversation with C.S Pacat at the Athenaeum Theatre on Monday, May 7, as part of the Mayhem series by The Wheeler Centre. Tickets are still available. I’ll be live-tweeting the event.

Review: Ballad for a Mad Girl by Vikki Wakefield

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The gully looks bottomless tonight. Some say Hannah Holt is buried in the gully, her uneasy spirit slipping from crevice to shadow, sniffing for fear, and when she smells it she’ll pull you down by the ankles with her teeth. We all know the stories are spread by grown-ups to keep us away from the quarry, but this is the first time I’ve ever thought about Hannah Holt, or William Dean, before I’ve crossed. I can’t help wondering whether he closed his eyes when he jumped, or met the rocks with them wide open.

Ballad for a Mad Girl is a fantastic genre-bending read. It is part contemporary, part thriller, part murder mystery, part supernatural horror. Just when I thought I was getting comfortable in the direction the novel was going, Vikki Wakefield changed the tempo.

Two years have passed since Grace Foley’s mother was hit and killed by a car. It is not the first tragedy to befall the small country town of Swanston, as teen Hannah Holt mysteriously disappeared twenty-three years prior, rumoured to be at the hands of Willliam Dean. Rumour has it that William hid her body down the local quarry, the same quarry where he would later fall to his death.

The Foley family have moved from the family farm to a house in town, and seventeen-year-old Grace is struggling with the rules her suffocating yet distant father has set, which do not seem to apply to her brother Cody, despite the fact that he is only three years older than her. Everything around her is changing – her friends, her family, her sense of self. She clings to her reputation as the town prankster and record holder for the fastest crossing at the quarry. But after a death-defying crossing goes wrong, Grace finds herself haunted by a ghost, the presence of which brings up a renewed sense of grief for her mother. With her reputation as the town prankster ensuring no one will believe her, Grace is forced to go it alone to uncover why she is being haunted.

Grace is a highly emotionally evocative narrator to follow. She considers herself to be the hero and saviour of her group of friends, which includes Gummer, Amber, Pete and Kenzie.

We were leftovers. Only it didn’t feel that way. It felt like we chose each other carefully, to make sure all our odd shapes fitted together.

Grace is established as an unreliable narrator, as Kenzie argues that she wasn’t saved by Grace when they became friends. Amber and Gummer both question whether they have outgrown their predetermined roles in the group. While offering brief moments of introspection, Grace largely responds with anger and defiance – clashing with and hurting her friends, and upping the ante on her pranks. It would be easy to just be angry with Grace, but at the heart of her rage lies fear that Wakefield has beautifully understated – fear that her friends are moving on without her. While the quote on the back of the book, At this rate I won’t survive high school. I’ll be a dead friendless virgin., gives the impression that one of Grace’s core concerns is not being able to find a sexual partner, the book is more focused on her friendship dynamics, which was a refreshing change. Another layer of intrigue is added to Grace’s character, as underpinning her anger is the looming presence of the ghost, which calls into question whether Grace’s anger stems from her grief, her changing friendships, or from the ghost.

Ballad for a Mad Girl deals with some pretty heavy-handed material, the death of Graces’ mother and the impact her grief has on Grace’s relationship with her friends and family, as well as the horror elements of the ghostly encounters, but Wakefield beautifully crafts the narrative without the novel plummeting to overbearing despair or gratuitous violence or gore. Much of this can be attributed to the complexities of the characters, and also Wakefield’s prose, which is interspersed with beautiful imagery. A cemetery scene filled with gothic imagery exemplifies Wakefield’s masterful craft.

Overhead, hundreds of swallows fly in perfect formation like a dancing cloud, and Maria’s angel gazes down solemnly as I pass. Above the noise of traffic out on the road, I hear the rustle of leaves. But there aren’t enough trees here to make that much sound. It’s voices. A chorus of whispering—real, or imagined, I can’t tell—that only gets louder as I approach the barrier of tape.

 

I loved everything about this book. The multifaceted characters who could say too much and not enough. The blurring of genres. The poignancy and sharpness of the depiction of grief that left me in tears more than once. The grittiness and beauty of the narrative.

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2018 YA Showcase – #LoveOzYA highlights

The YA Showcase is a speed-dating session of sorts, where publishing house reps woo young and old YA fans alike with their most anticipated YA for the New Year. Run by the Centre for Youth Literature, the annual event continues to be a sell-out year after year. While international titles were once again showcased this year, I’m going to focus on my most anticipated LoveOzYA titles. Here, in no particular order, are my top 10 most anticipated #loveOzYA reads for 2018:

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Growing up Aboriginal in Australia
Edited by Anita Heiss
Black Inc
April 2018

A collection of non-fiction stories from Aboriginal writers, including Ambelin Kwaymullina and Celeste Liddle. Childhood stories of family, country and belonging.

 

 

The Art of Taxidermy
Sharon Kernot
Text Publishing
July 2018

A verse novel about a young girl grieving for her mother finds comfort in her fascination with taxidermy. I’ve been craving a good verse novel (bring on Maxine Beneba Clarke’s YA verse novel!), and taxidermy peaked my quirky interests. This novel was shortlisted for the 2017 Text Prize.

 

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Tin Heart
Shivaun Plozza
Penguin Books
March 2018

Frankie was Shivaun’s sharp, raw, hilarious and uplifting debut novel. I’m ridiculously excited to read her second novel, Tin Heart, which was pitched as a novel that explores identity, survival, family and an unlikely friendship/romance.

 

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Neverland
Margot McGovern
Penguin Books
April 2018

An edgy, dark read for older readers, Neverland explores how we misremember and romanticise the past. For fans of Fairytales for Wilde Girls, Our Chemical Hearts, On the Jelicoe Road and We Were Liars. The pitch had me at ‘edgy, dark…’.

 

 

Small Spaces
Sarah Epstein
Walker Books
April 2018

We don’t pick and choose what we are afraid of. A psychological thriller about a gruesome imaginary friend, a mute girl and dark secrets.

 

The Rift
Rachael Craw
Walker Books
November 2018

Okay, so Rachael isn’t Australian, but it’s fair to say we’ve claimed her as one of our own. The Rift is a dual-narrative fantasy promising action and ample swoonage. I loved Craw’s Spark trilogy, which was packed with suspense, humour and tenderness, so I am pumped for her next offering.

 

Catching Teller Crow
Ambelin and Ezekiel Kwaymullina
Allen & Unwin
August 2018

I was captivated by The Interrogation of Ashala Wolfso I am eager to see Ambelin’s next offering. Catching Teller Crow, which she co-wrote with her brother Ezekiel, explores sexualised violence against Indigenous girls, and how hope lies in the hearts and hopes of First Nations women.

 

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White Night
Ellie Marney
Allen & Unwin
March 2018

A secret off-the-grid community in rural Australia. Intriguing cult elements. I’m all for the “do not judge a book by its cover” adage, but IT’S SO PRETTY! Also, cults!

 

 

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Jay Kristoff
Allen & Unwin
May 2018

What does it mean to be human? Set in post-apocalyptic USA, the robotic population have been reduced to slaves and androids (robots that look like humans) have been outlawed. Eve and her best friend, Lemon, find an android in a scrapheap who knows the truth behind a robotic revolt.  Oh, and Eve discovers that she can destroy robotics with her mind.

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Whisper
Lynette Noni
Pantera Press
May 2018

The first in a new series, Jane Doe has been locked away and experimented on for two years. Her resolve begins to crack under the influence of her new evaluator, forcing her to question and uncover the truth about the program. An exclusive advanced reader copy was given out to all YA Showcase attendees, so I am one happy camper.

Review: The Loneliest Girl in the Universe by Lauren James

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‘I’ve set myself up for heartbreak – but I didn’t even know it was happening. I thought I was just happy to have a friend, someone to talk to after everyone on Earth abandoned me. I didn’t realise that I could feel this lust for someone I’ve never even seen.’

16 year-old Romy Silvers is the only surviving crew member on-board The Infinity, a spaceship on a predicted 44-year mission bound for Earth II. Romy tries to keep busy by reading the ships manual and NASA-designated homework, writing fanfic of Loch & Ness, and exchanging audio mail with her therapist, Molly. Molly sends an audio mail to Romy, telling her that a superior spacecraft, The Eternity, was launched not long after The Infinity disaster to meet up with The Eternity and help complete the mission. Romy learns that it will only take a year for The Infinity to reach The Eternity. While trying to fathom what it will be like to have physical human contact again after over 5 years of solitude, The Eternity makes contact. Their only communication is via email, and the messages take months to transmit, yet Romy finds herself falling in love with the crew member of The Eternity, J. But as The Eternity draws closer, and she receives strange messages from Earth, Romy must question her new-found reliance on J, and what these strange messages from Earth mean.

The Loneliest Girl in the Universe got off to a shaky start, as while the opening entry from Romy is set up as an action-packed and suspenseful insight into life on the spaceship, it had moments of telling the reader what could happen, which lessened the impact of the following action, for example “I’m abruptly filled with complete and utter fear. The guidance system has crashed. I need to take manual control, otherwise we’re going to be hit by an asteroid within the next few minutes.” Without going into detail, in order to keep spoilers to a minimum, the plot was largely predictable, as there were moments where Romy overstated observations.

This is not to say this book wasn’t an enjoyable read. The structure was brilliant, with the chapter headings highlighting the isolation Romy is experiencing by tallying how many days it has been since The Infinity left Earth, and, in other chapters, fuelling the suspense and anticipation by tallying how far away The Eternity is. The attention to detail with the mechanics of space travel is exemplified in the use of communications, as Romy later explains “transmissions to and from Earth are sent by laser, encoded in binary. An antenna on Earth conveys the laser beams to The Infinity, where a light array picks up the signal and converts it back into letters, images or sounds. The uplink from Earth takes a long time, and apparently video files just aren’t feasible to send. It takes hours for the antennas to transmit them, compared with the minutes required for audio or text messages.” Tech highlights just how isolating life is for Romy, and is poignantly shown as she turns on Google Earth and tries to imagine what it would be like to experience the mundane freedoms we take for granted.

Tech-savvy Romy is a captivating multifaceted narrator. Her anxiety is palpable, which at one point manifests through trichotillomania, and she fights to pull herself out of high anxiety or depressive episodes by focusing on the running of the ship or, at one stage, trying to dance it out. Romy has moments of joy, as she marvels at the thought of seeing Earth II as well as the gratification of pushing herself to excel at maths. It’s refreshing to read a female character whose goals in life are not limited to romance, despite the loneliness she feels throughout the book and the feelings she develops for J. It’s an added bonus to follow a female character where the taboos of menstruation and masturbation are addressed.

The Loneliest Girl in the Universe was an enjoyable read, with well-balanced moments of suspense, horror and romance.

With thanks to Walker Books, for providing a copy in an exchange for an honest review.

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Review: ‘The Hate U Give’ by Angie Thomas

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When I was twelve, my parents had two talks with me.

One was the usual birds and bees. Well, I didn’t really get the usual version. My mom, Lisa, is a registered nurse and she told me what went where, and what didn’t need to go here, there or any damn where till I’m grown. Back then, I doubted anything was going anywhere anyway. While all the other girls sprouted breasts between sixth and seventh grade, my chest was as flat as my back.

The other talk was about what to do if a cop stopped me.

The Hate U Give is a confronting read about the intrinsic racism in police brutality, the accompanying media coverage of the victims, and the power of resistance. When she is 10 years old, Starr’s friend Natasha is killed in a drive-by shooting. In order to protect her family, her mother sends Starr and her siblings, Seven and Sekani, to a bourgeoisie school at Williamson, a predominantly white community where tokenism, ignorance and casual racism are an everyday occurrence. Starr creates a Williamson Starr persona, ‘who doesn’t use slang – if a rapper would say it, she doesn’t say it, even if her white friends do. Slang makes them cool. Slang makes her “hood”’, in order to try and protect herself from racism from fellow students. Williamson epitomises white privilege, through the affluence of the housing and the casual racism of fellow student, Hailey. The depiction of Hailey’s wilful ignorance of racist-fuelled brutality, and her off-handed racist remarks guised as jokes accompanied by her supposed friendship shown towards Starr is hard to read, as it only causes Starr to retreat further into herself and struggle to project the Williamson Starr persona at the expense of living her own truth.

When her childhood friend Khalil is shot and killed in front of her by a white cop, Starr is overwhelmed by the pressure of protecting herself and speaking out. Starr is all too aware of the racist media coverage of police shootings, where the victims are presented as thugs while the police are hailed as protectors who are just doing their job. Social media is referenced throughout The Hate U Give, as both a safe space for Starr to attempt to educate her peers about racist-fuelled shootings and to humanise the victims. During her keynote address at the Melbourne Writers Festival, Angie spoke of how she was motivated to write the novel to humanise victims of racism. The depiction of the shootings of Natasha and Khalil are carefully crafted, as rather than focusing on the physical brutality of the act, Angie draws focus to the shock of the loss of life.

The Hate U Give confronts the ugliness of racism, but manages to perfectly balance the violence and anguish surrounding the shootings with the love of family and the close-knit community of Garden Heights. From the admiration Starr has for her strong and affectionate mother and the passionate relationship between her parents, to the familiarity of neighbours and shopkeepers, Angie Thomas has written a beautiful, harrowing and unflinching Young Adult novel which offers hope through the power of truth, resistance and love.  My heart ached, my mind was opened and I was reminded of the privilege I have as a white person, not just through the depiction of the murder of Khalil, but of the day to day precautions Starr and her family are forced to make to minimise the risk of being gunned down by those who are supposed to protect them. A beautifully written novel I will undoubtedly reread again and again.

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Event highlight: Melbourne Writers’ Festival – ‘Angie Thomas: YA and Activism’

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‘Today I am here to beg you to change the world’

It’s hard to believe Angie Thomas’ keynote, the first YA keynote Melbourne Writers’ Festival has ever had, was not a sell-out. Angie’s debut novel, The Hate U Give, has been sitting at #1 on the New York Times Bestseller list for 26 consecutive weeks. It has been published in over 20 countries and is currently in its 16th reprint. Angie was mesmerising, as she delivered a passionate speech that was equal parts moving, hilarious and inspiring. She often broke from her speech to joke about what her mother would think; she pondered what would her mother say if she saw her daughter addressing a crowd wearing a Gryffindor jumper (I’m pretty sure everyone in the room not only approved, but wanted to ask where one could be purchased), or how her mother would react if she heard her swear (Angie sought permission from the audience before doing so).  ‘Angie Thomas: YA and Activism’ was chaired by Beverley Wang, a journalist, radio producer and host of the popular ABC podcast It’s Not a Race. Wang introduced Thomas by praising The Hate U Give as ‘a Young Adult book that all adults need to read as well’.

‘Today I am here to beg you to change the world’. Angie commanded attention with her opening statement, and held that attention throughout her address. She clearly conveyed her passion for writing Young Adult fiction, as she expressed her belief that young adults have an awareness, passion, and belief that they can change the world. Angie believes adults do not share that same belief as teens, as ‘once we become adults we realise how big the world is’. Acknowledging many of the adults in the audience were Young Adult fiction writers, Angie noted that ‘as writers, you have the power to do just that’ (change the world).

While Angie said ‘books showed me that there was more to the world’, as a teen she struggled to see herself in published Young Adult fiction. Twilight was considered THE Young Adult book, but she didn’t recognise herself on the page, and joked about how her mother would never let her talk to a man that old. Angie joked about how if her name had been called out during The Hunger Games, her mother would have marched right up to the organisers and stopped it from happening. Angie lamented that ‘usually kids like me were the sassy sidekicks … or the wisdom giver’. Angie loves the Harry Potter series, as she identified strongly with Hermione Granger, and viewed Voldemort as a drug dealer and Hogwarts was her community. Angie was thrilled when Noma Dumezweni was cast as Hermione in Harry Potter and the Cursed Child.

Because of the absence of representation in YA, she said ‘I didn’t think my life mattered, or lives like mine mattered’. Angie saw herself in hip-hop, a movement, she noted, that was founded by teens. It was a way for teens to have a voice – about their lives, about what mattered. Angie’s heroes were rappers, as it felt like ‘somebody saw me, and they said it mattered’. ‘Hip-hop scared people because it was so raw’. There is a truth to hip-hop that can be confronting. Angie later went on to say ‘true change comes with discomfort’ and ‘I don’t think there’s anything wrong with fear … it’s what you do with it’.

While The Hate U Give has been interpreted by some as a distinctive Black Lives Matter political novel, Angie wrote The Hate U Give as a short story, well before she was aware of the Black Lives Matter movement. She wrote the story in response to a shooting in her town. Writing was the only way Angie knew how to get her frustration out, and eventually turned the story into a novel because, she said, ‘I need people outside of my neighbourhood to see’. She noted that when young victims are placed on the news, they are always made to seem older than they are. Angie wanted her book to be personal, not political, to humanise and show truth behind the headline. ‘Starr is a child. They were children’, she said, and later added ‘why is it that we make them antagonists in their own deaths?’ When Beverley asked Angie about her reaction to having Trump as President, Angie responded by saying ‘I have more hope now than I did before the election … people are speaking up now.’ She reminded the audience that racism is not new, it is just becoming more visible due to social media. The sense of hope and love Angie conveyed was incredibly moving, as she said ‘I know where the power lies, and it’s with the people’.

Angie implored the audience to ‘examine why you do it. Why do you write for young adults?’ This question was framed around an acknowledgment that ‘Young Adult books catch a lot of flak’, and while she jokingly referenced the Handbook for Mortals saga by saying ‘apparently some people see it (YA) as a way to get movies made’, her frustration that ‘people downplay (YA)’ was clear. Angie argued that teens today are ‘more aware, more conscious of things’, particularly due to social media. So, while she acknowledged that many YA writers write for younger versions of themselves, Angie believes we should ‘take ourselves out of it, and focus on who we’re writing for.’

There’s so much more that was talked about during the keynote, as well as the question time afterwards. I feel like I’ve barely scraped the surface. I was focused on Angie for the duration of the event, so I wasn’t aware whether the session was filmed or not. I hope it was. The only lowlight of the event came from an audience member, who asked, in what I interpreted to be a rather aggressive tone, what is worse, to write from your own experience or to write outside your own experience? The frustration in the audience member’s voice made me cringe. Angie was gracious in her reply, as she politely challenged the crowd to ask themselves why they want to write it, and why they would be the best possible person to tell that story. She urged writers to put in the work (do research, consult with relevant groups), to be prepared for criticism, and to LISTEN to and learn from any criticism.

‘Angie Thomas: YA and Activism’ was inspiring, moving, hilarious and full of heart. I’ve been to many MWF sessions over the years. This event will stay with me for the longest time.

 

I finished reading (and loved) The Hate U Give. My review is still to come. I only have the opportunity to attend one other MWF event this year, which will be #loveozya 

Review: ‘Eleanor & Park’ by Rainbow Rowell

“The new girl took a deep breath and stepped farther down the aisle. Nobody would look at her. Park tried not to, but it was kind of a train wreck/eclipse situation.

The girl just looked like exactly the sort of person this would happen to.

Not just new – but big and awkward. With crazy hair, bright red on top of curly. And she was dressed like … like she wanted people to look at her. Or maybe she didn’t get what a mess she was.”

Eleanor is the new girl in town who draws attention to herself the moment she steps on the bus, through her curly red hair and mismatched clothes. Park is the boy at the back of the bus who tries to go unnoticed by keeping his headphones on and his head down in a comic. Stuck next to each other for an hour a day, Eleanor and Park slowly, unintentionally and cautiously get to know each other, first through shared comics and mixed tapes, and then through late night phone calls. They fall in love, with nothing and everything to lose.

Eleanor & Park is written in third person omniscient, which is a refreshing change from the abundance of first person YA narratives. Splitting the perspective between Eleanor and Park allows the reader to gain some insight into the mind of each of the protagonists, however by writing in third person omniscient, Rainbow Rowell maintains a sense of distance between the characters and the reader. After all, this novel isn’t a story about absolute truths, nor does the novel offer a neatly rounded conclusion. The focus of Eleanor & Park is on the journey of discovery, of the little steps the characters make to learn more about themselves.

The beauty and power of the relationship between Eleanor and Park isn’t in what they say to each other, but what is left unsaid. The relationship is established through Eleanor (in)discretely reading a comic over Park’s shoulder, and through Park wordlessly lending her a comic for the first time. The timid exchange between the two characters is beautiful to follow, but as their family dynamics are explored it becomes apparent that what is being presented is not only shyness due to inexperience, but fear of reprisal from their respective families. Park is struggling with his sense of identity and what it means to be masculine; having his father constantly compare him to his brother does nothing to ease his anxiety. Eleanor’s mother and her siblings live in the flats with her abusive partner. The abuse inflicted upon Eleanor and her family is confronting, and Eleanor’s sense of helplessness is heartbreaking to follow. The relationship between Eleanor and Park offers them each an opportunity for learn about themselves and find a strength within themselves neither knew existed.

This book has been on my to-read list for a while. Seeing Rainbow Rowell at the 2016 Melbourne Writers Festival prompted me to finally go out and buy a copy.

I was fascinated by the original cover before I even read the synopsis – the simple yet so very intimate image of Eleanor and Park set apart, but joined together by earphones. This edition wasn’t available. Instead, I purchased the UK edition. The design is beautiful, and, similar to the US edition, suggests a distance yet also closeness between Eleanor and Park through the way they are placed on the page. But, as I read the novel I kept looking back at the cover – where was the ‘big and awkward’ girl with ‘crazy hair’? It’s refreshing to read a protagonist who isn’t a super slim blonde-haired, blue-eyed girl, and it felt like this cover diminished, or at the very least undersold, her character.

Eleanor & Park is a quintessential Young Adult novel, as it is all about the journey from innocence to experience, rather than the destination. As such, the ending was perfect. At the 2016 Melbourne Writers Festival Claire Zorn listed cited Eleanor & Park as a book she wished she had read as a teenager, and I can understand why. The characters are beautiful, complex and full of contradictions that make them feel like they could step out of the pages. The novel covers a broad range of issues, including young love, domestic abuse, body image, bullying, gender identity, peer pressure and racism, without seeming forced or heavy-handed. A brilliant read.

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